The hummers are here.

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The spring bird migration is fast approaching. I hope to get some photos of my guests as they pass through on their way to points northward. Meanwhile, I’ll enjoy the hummers.
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PS While sitting on the porch, watching the hummers, my son and I watched a gorgeous pileated woodpecker eating on one of our trees, and a red-bellied woodpecker was eating on the tree next to it. What a treat!!! The photos don’t do them justice.

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I have to go clean the bird bath now! The guests are arriving early!

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Comments

The hummers are here. — 5 Comments

  1. Have you seen anything besides Ruby Throated? Lots of different kinds of hummingbirds in the west.

    Only Ruby Throated at my feeder so far. But this morning, as we sat on the porch doing math, Seth spied a pileated woodpecker on a tree in the back yard, and in the tree next to that, a downy woodpecker! He’s getting to be a great birder!

  2. OMG. Hummingbirds already. I doubt we’ll see them for a month. May is our prime month for migration.

    I just love your blog. It’s a treat to see the photos and read about life down south.

    Such kind words, Sue. Thanks so much! I hope to get some good bird photos as they come through.

  3. My all time favorite bird is the hummingbird. I used to draw them for my dad to relief carve…then he got better than me and started making tiny wooden hummers, perfectly balanced to hang in our kitchen windows…He always had a love for them that he shared with me. Started with one feeder, then a second, ending with about 6 and at peak times having to refill them more than once a day. He planted a weaping willow tree next to the kitchen window and they loved it!!! they could flit in and out easily. The most incredible experience (next to birthing my son) was standing perfectly still amongst the willow branches and having hummers land on my fingers, head and shoulders. What an incredible experience. At times, we couldn’t sit on the back porch for the multiple dive bombers swooping by as they guarded their territories. There were often as many as 50 to 80 at a time and we would sit for hours watching them. My dad was delighted when he found his first nest, we couldnt belive how tiny the eggs were. He carefully replaced it, but the eggs never hatched. I really miss those days, but thanks for the memories. I think I shall go out and buy a humming feeder, perhaps pass on my passion with my son, ………..Please tell your visitors to stop by for a visit when they move on up north..lol.
    Always, ALWAYS, enjoy your posts. Sorry for the irratic visits, weird shift schedules lately.
    Deb in TX

  4. What timing….I just had my first visitor today and had to rush out to fill the feeder. The polite hummer hung around until I replaced it. I have one hummer that came back every year.

  5. We named him Pee Wee because he had a stubby tail and was the tiniest of them all. One day my cat swatted him to the ground and I scooped him up. I couldn’t find any outward signs of injury but I called an emergency vet to ask what I should do. The vet. said it was in shock and probably wouldn’t live. Put it in a box, with a lamp for warmth, a perch so it could stand and food. I topped the box with a food strainer, placed the box in the bathroom and prayed.

    Next morning I made my hubby check on him because I was too afraid to do it myself. He was doing great and even drank some of the food. I released him and he hovered in front of my face before flying away.

    He returned for several years and would get very close to my face and twitter at me.

    True story.

    Thanks, KB, for that wonderful story!

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