Shrimp Bisque

You know, sometimes you just have to take time out to smell the roses or help a friend.  That’s exactly what I did last Thursday when my friend, Kay, asked me to take a ride with her to Dulac to pick up some fresh shrimp from a boat docked behind Schmoopy’s, our favorite local restaurant. (She had won the shrimp at a charity auction.)  It was a beautiful day for a drive, and when we arrived at the About Time, female shrimper, Caroline, gave Kay 15 pounds of beautiful shrimp to match the day. There were no roses anywhere in sight, sorry to say!

Kay then generously offered the shrimp to me, so we drove the back road from Dulac to Bayou Dularge in short time and dropped off the ice chest at my house. It truly was a gorgeous fall day for a drive.  

boiled.shrimpOn Friday, Termite and his gal, Coco, came down, and Termite did a fantastic job of boiling up those pretty shrimp, along with potatoes, mini-ears of corn, and a little smoked sausage. He used Louisiana brand liquid and powdered seasoning, and they turned out perfect.  We ate until we were stuffed, but there were still several pounds of shrimp leftover.  

What to do with those leftover boiled shrimp? Develop a nice bisque using ALL the leftover ingredients.  And that’s exactly what I did yesterday, (day after the 5 Bayous Fishing Rodeo). The weather here is cool for us, early-morning temps of 55, so what warms the bones better than a homemade bisque?

The great thing about this recipe is that you don’t need all the ingredients leftover from a shrimp boil to make it delicious, simply because the sauce is already so good!  You can use shrimp alone, or any combination of potatoes, sausage, or corn depending on what you have leftover. OR, if you boiled crabs, substitute crab meat for shrimp, and voila! You’ve got a hardy crab bisque.

Certainly you could serve this dish with crackers or fresh, buttered French bread (for dipping), but I made croutons in the oven, and we put them on top of our bisque, and they added a nice crunch without taking away from the smooth texture and nice spice of the bisque.  

This is definitely a keeper and is now added to the Bayou Woman Recipe box!

Here’s the recipe for y’all.

served
Print
Shrimp and Corn Bisque
Prep Time
1 hr
Cook Time
45 mins
Total Time
1 hr 45 mins
 
Delicious bisque made with leftover boiled shrimp, corn, potatoes, and sausage.
Servings: 8
Author: Bayou Woman
Ingredients
  • 1 stick butter
  • 2 stalks celery sliced/chopped thin
  • 1/4 Cup green onions sliced thin
  • 2/3 Cup flour
  • 4 Cups half and half
  • 4 Cups shrimp stock seafood stock, or chicken broth if others not available
  • 4 mini ears of corn scrape kernels off of cob
  • 2 in short lengths of smoked sausage leftover from boil quartered, and cut small pieces
  • 4 Cups boiled shrimp if large, cut in halves or thirds, peeled and de-veined
  • 4 in halves of potato from boil cubed small cubes
  • 1 tsp salt but taste before adding salt
  • Fresh ground black pepper to taste
Garnish
  • Top with fresh homemade croutons
Instructions
For the bisque
  1. Melt butter in heavy dutch oven type pot
  2. Saute` celery and green onions on low until limp and clear
  3. Stir in flour, gradually
  4. Add half and half one cup at a time, stirring until smooth
  5. Simmer for 5 minutes
  6. Add stock, stir, and simmer for 5 minutes
  7. Add corn and sausage, simmer 5 minutes
  8. Add shrimp and simmer 5 minutes. Stir often so bottom does not stick or scorch
  9. Add potatoes and simmer 5-10 minutes. You're just heating the potatoes through, since they are already cooked, and you don't want them to fall apart.
  10. Taste for salt and pepper, add as needed.
Croutons
  1. Cube French bread (or whole wheat or white bread) into small cubes, place on sprayed baking sheet, bake at 350 for 15 minutes, turn, bake another 15 minutes. Should be nice and crunchy.
  2. Place approximately 6 cubes on top of bisque in individual soup bowls.
Recipe Notes
Note:
This can be made with shrimp only and is still delicious without the corn, sausage, and potatoes. It will be more like a soup at that point and not as hardy as a stew like this recipe.

For those of us who like more photos, here’s a little progression of the recipe.

Everyone loved it, and when Kay sees this post (or I tell her about the dish), she’s going to be upset with me that there was none left to share with her.  Oh well, maybe next time!

Stay warm, my friends,

BW

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Comments

Shrimp Bisque — 15 Comments

    • It’s a little time consuming if you de-vein the shrimp, and with smaller ones, it’s not necessary; but these were kind of big! You should try it, and he will be pleasantly pleased . . . maybe a birthday dinner?

  1. Oh, my. This looks just wonderful, but it’s not something I’d ever try for myself. That butter, half-and-half, and calorie count is attention-getting. But, I’ve copied the recipe and tucked it away. Maybe I need to throw a little dinner party, and impress the heck out of everyone!

    • I know the calorie count, etc, is a little off putting for health reason . . . but serving a little cupful as an appetizer would be a great compromise!

  2. That looks as good as anything you’d find in an upscale eatery!

    I’ll have to copy this off for my relatives, who LOVE shrimp.

  3. You wrote “What to do with those leftover boiled shrimp”…
    Did you consider sharing with those of us who might be cooking impaired? Those of us living on a fixed income? Those of us so destitute we’re forced to go to KFC to lick other people’s fingers?

    Wonderful story and a great recipe..

    • Oh, George, you made me laugh with your woe of being forced to go to KFB to lick other people’s fingers!!! And please note: those gorgeous shrimp were given to us!! So, yeah, I get where you’re coming from! But surely we wouldn’t want those shrimp to go to waste now, would we? It is indeed a great recipe and one that makes me wonder why I didn’t develop it a long time ago. Oh wait, I know why. We don’t often boil shrimp, and when we do, they’re are seldom any leftover!!! Thanks, George!

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